In the Spotlight

Recording Now Available For the Project Venture – Positive Youth Development for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Youth Webinar

posted Sep 25, 2017, 1:40 PM by Tech Support   [ updated Sep 25, 2017, 1:41 PM ]

Watch the latest AI/AN NPA Caucus webinar about Project Venture, an evidence-based intervention, combines traditional native wisdom with positive youth development, social emotional learning, outdoor adventure, and service learning to create a unique approach that has been successful for more than 25 years. The webinar highlights the project’s core elements and guiding principles of this unique, internationally recognized native youth program and assist participants with exploring their readiness to implement it.

View it here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-xHX2IDI1epT19aeHE3SUFkT00

Join us for a special webinar hosted by the American Indian and Alaska Native NPA Caucus!

posted Aug 22, 2017, 7:54 AM by Tech Support   [ updated Aug 22, 2017, 7:54 AM ]

Project Venture, an evidence-based intervention, combines traditional native wisdom with positive youth development, social emotional learning, outdoor adventure, and service learning to create a unique approach that has been successful for more than 25 years. Beginning with a camp in Oklahoma during 1982, Project Venture has evolved into a model program recognized by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) that has been implemented in 25 states, 8 Canadian provinces, and Hungary. The National Indian Youth Leadership Project founded Project Venture and provides training, coaching, mentoring, curriculum development, and grant-writing assistance to program participants. The webinar will highlight the project’s core elements and guiding principles of this unique, internationally recognized native youth program and assist participants with exploring their readiness to implement it.

TOPIC: Project Venture – Positive Youth Development for American Indian and Alaska Native Youth
MODERATOR: Dr. Francine Gachupin,
Member, American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) NPA Caucus
SPEAKER: McClellan Hall, Founder and Executive Director of the National Indian Youth Leadership Project
DATE: September 20, 2017
TIME: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. ET

Register Here: https://explorepsa.adobeconnect.com/aian-september-2017/event/event_info.html
Click Here for Abstract and Speaker Biography: http://bit.ly/2x8JEen

The American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities (NPA) Caucus provides a forum for members to increase dialogue across the country and to coordinate and enhance tribal, state, and local efforts to address health disparities and the social determinants of health for AI/ANs.


** If the registration link does not work, please copy the entire link and paste it into your web browser. For webinar-specific or technical questions, contact the moderator at csantos@explorepsa.com.

Unintentional Injuries are a Leading Cause of Death for American Indian and Alaska Native Populations by Dr. Joe Coulter

posted Aug 17, 2017, 2:08 PM by Tech Support   [ updated Aug 17, 2017, 2:08 PM ]

It is no secret that American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations face unique challenges. Whether it be the extreme remoteness of some tribal lands, the lack of available resources, environmental concerns, or access to adequate healthcare, gaining health equity for AI/AN populations might seem insurmountable. However, given the right amount of focus, resources and involvement from the community, even the most pressing barriers and obstacles to care facing AI/ANs can be addressed – leading to greater health of Native populations.  
Among the myriad of challenges faced by American Indians and Alaska Natives, unintentional injuries remains one of the leading causes of death. There are a number of factors that may explain why unintended injuries continue to be a leading cause of death, but the bigger question and the greater challenge is how to reduce unintended deaths and injuries among AI/ANs. 


Unintentional Death and Injuries Among the AI/AN Population 

For American Indians and Alaska Natives, death and injury rates are staggering compared to those for the non-AI/AN population. For example, while eight percent of the general population will die before they reach 45 years of age, for AI/ANs, that number increases to 25% (one out of four). The sad but true fact is that a quarter of the Native population won’t see their 45th birthday not because of medical, chronic or genetic issues but rather avoidable and preventable unintentional injuries that lead to death. When the data are broken down by age, this is a common trend regardless of which age group is being examined. 


Why Unintentional Injuries are So Dangerous 

Support for many of the social determinants of health that contribute to a Native person’s overall well-being are lacking for this population. Many factors – such as socioeconomic status, geographic location, access to health care and health services, transportation, nutrition, and lack of physical activity contribute to the problem. 

Most Indian tribal lands are located in remote, isolated areas. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, deaths from car accidents are greater in rural than urban areas. Among AI/AN 19 years old and younger, motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of unintentional injury-related death, followed by drowning and poisoning. 

Being rural alone does not lead to the unintentional death rate crisis that AI/AN people currently face, but it does contribute to another key factor, which is environment. Many tribes and Indian tribal lands are located in areas where the environment can be seen as perilous. Similarly, access to health services is extremely limited in these areas meaning that Native individuals need to travel great distances to receive their medical care. Conversely, medical professionals need to travel great distances to reach those who call for help. Additionally, lack of healthy and/or nutritional options and lack of transportation other than people’s own vehicles exacerbate both the causes of unintentional injuries and death. 


What can be Done? 

While the statistics paint a bleak picture, there is hope. Although the data on unintentional injury leading to death rates for American Indian and Alaska Natives are striking, they actually show a slight improvement – indicating both the scope of the problem and the fact that small changes, such as education and intervention, can lead to significant improvements. As attention to this issue increases, more solutions can be developed and implemented. By starting with culturally competent, socially acceptable approaches and focusing on each of the aforementioned social determinants, progress can – and will – be made to alleviate the extremely high rates of unintentional injuries and deaths among our Native populations. 

AI/AN Caucus Member Dr. Joe Coulter explains the crisis of unintended deaths and injuries in Indian Country

posted Jun 8, 2017, 6:45 AM by Tech Support   [ updated Jun 8, 2017, 6:46 AM ]


An Unintended Legacy: Unintentional Injuries are a Leading Cause of Death for American Indian and Alaska Native Populations
By Joe D. Coulter, Ph. D.


Introduction

It is no secret that American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations face unique challenges. Whether it be the extreme remoteness of some tribal lands, the lack of available resources, environmental concerns, or access to adequate healthcare, gaining health equity for AI/AN populations might seem insurmountable. However, given the right amount of focus, resources and involvement from the community, even the most pressing barriers and obstacles to care facing AI/ANs can be addressed – leading to greater health of Native populations.

Among the myriad of challenges faced by American Indians and Alaska Natives, unintentional injuries remains one of the leading causes of death. There are a number of factors that may explain why unintended injuries continue to be a leading cause of death, but the bigger question and the greater challenge is how to reduce unintended deaths and injuries among AI/ANs.


Unintentional Death and Injuries Among the AI/AN Population

For American Indians and Alaska Natives, death and injury rates are staggering compared to those for the non-AI/AN population. For example, while eight percent of the general population will die before they reach 45 years of age, for AI/ANs, that number increases to 25% (one out of four). The sad but true fact is that a quarter of the Native population won’t see their 45th birthday not because of medical, chronic or genetic issues but rather avoidable and preventable unintentional injuries that lead to death. When the data are broken down by age, this is a common trend regardless of which age group is being examined.


Why Unintentional Injuries are So Dangerous

Support for many of the social determinants of health that contribute to a Native person’s overall well-being are lacking for this population. Many factors – such as socioeconomic status, geographic location, access to health care and health services, transportation, nutrition, and lack of physical activity contribute to the problem.

Most Indian tribal lands are located in remote, isolated areas. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, deaths from car accidents are greater in rural than urban areas. Among AI/AN 19 years old and younger, motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of unintentional injury-related death, followed by drowning and poisoning.

Being rural alone does not lead to the unintentional death rate crisis that AI/AN people currently face, but it does contribute to another key factor, which is environment. Many tribes and Indian tribal lands are located in areas where the environment can be seen as perilous. Similarly, access to health services is extremely limited in these areas meaning that Native individuals need to travel great distances to receive their medical care. Conversely, medical professionals need to travel great distances to reach those who call for help. Additionally, lack of healthy and/or nutritional options and lack of transportation other than people’s own vehicles exacerbate both the causes of unintentional injuries and death.


What can be Done?

While the statistics paint a bleak picture, there is hope. Although the data on unintentional injury leading to death rates for American Indian and Alaska Natives are striking, they actually show a slight improvement – indicating both the scope of the problem and the fact that small changes, such as education and intervention, can lead to significant improvements. As attention to this issue increases, more solutions can be developed and implemented. By starting with culturally competent, socially acceptable approaches and focusing on each of the aforementioned social determinants, progress can – and will – be made to alleviate the extremely high rates of unintentional injuries and deaths among our Native populations.


###

Dr. Joe Coulter is Professor Emeritus, College of Public Health, Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, a member of the National Partnership for Action’s (NPA) AI/AN Caucus and an enrolled member of the Potawatomi Tribe.

Author’s note: all statistics come from the HIS report, "Trends in Indian Health: 2014" unless otherwise noted. For more information, the full report can be found here.

Now Available- Recording from the latest American Indian and Alaska Native Behavioral Health Webinar: Addressing Mental Illness.

posted May 25, 2017, 11:51 AM by Tech Support   [ updated May 31, 2017, 9:35 AM ]

The recording of the latest American Indian and Alaska Native Behavioral Health Webinar: Addressing Mental Illness is now available. The webinar focuses on the work of the Hope Squad Program, a school-based peer advocate program that works to prevent suicide and decrease the incidence of untreated mental illness, is now available. The webinar covered the history and creation of the program, how the program is implemented, ways in which the program has been successful, and reasons for implementing a Hope Squad in your community.

Now Available- Recording Of The latest American Indian and Alaska Native Behavioral Health Webinar: The National Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda

posted May 8, 2017, 1:05 PM by Tech Support   [ updated May 8, 2017, 1:05 PM ]

The recording of the latest AI/AN Behavioral Health webinar on the National Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda (TBHA) is now available. The TBHA marks the first tribally informed blueprint for improving behavioral health outcomes in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. During this webinar, NIHB staff will provide an in-depth analysis of the TBHA, including its five foundational elements, and will provide an overview of the various strategies and recommendations it puts forth for addressing behavioral health concerns.

View it here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3J1kFXVQHf1TVJtOEVwcWVldm8/view

Register For The American Indian And Alaska Native (AI/AN) Webinar On Addressing Mental Illness

posted May 5, 2017, 12:16 PM by Tech Support   [ updated May 8, 2017, 7:03 AM ]

The webinar will take place on May 18 at 3-4 p.m. EST and will feature the Hope Squad Program, a school-based peer advocate program that works to prevent suicide and decrease the incidence of untreated mental illness.The webinar will cover the history and creation of the program, how the program is implemented, ways in which the program has been successful, and reasons for implementing a Hope Squad in your community.

Learn more and register:
http://tinyurl.com/HopeSquadRegistration

Mountain States RHEC Will Host Native American Cultural Competency Webinar

posted Jan 24, 2017, 11:00 AM by Tech Support   [ updated Apr 21, 2017, 10:34 AM ]

The Mountain States RHEC will host a webinar training series on the history of tribes and treaties, utilization of CLAS Standards and cultural sensitivity when working with tribal communities and the impact of cultural needs assessments. 

To learn more and register: 
https://explorepsa.adobeconnect.com/rhec8/event/event_info.html


Tribal Epidemiology Centers Strengthen the Public Health Capacity of Communities

posted Apr 26, 2016, 7:03 AM by Tech Support   [ updated Apr 21, 2017, 10:35 AM ]

Through the years, American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations have been underrepresented in the data surveillance that informs health decisions at the federal, state, tribal and local level. In an effort to provide much-needed data to policymakers and local leaders, including tribal leadership, the Indian Health Service (IHS) established Tribal Epidemiology Centers (TECs) in 1996. To view/download the full article please see below.

Native CDFIs Providing Hope via Financial Literacy, Economic Opportunity

posted Apr 26, 2016, 6:59 AM by Tech Support   [ updated Apr 21, 2017, 10:35 AM ]

In the language of the tribal Native American group, the Lakota, there is no traditional word for money. That makes the work of the Four Bands Community Fund, a nonprofit and Native Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) all the more important. The organization’s mission is to create economic opportunity for residents of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in South Dakota and also to help the people better understand the basics of money. To view/download the full article please see below.

1-10 of 13